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How to Test Your Pool Water Chemistry

Do you test your pool’s water chemistry often, or are you just dosing your pool periodically? Did you know there are multiple ways you can test a pool’s chemical balance? Here, we’ll walk you through the different tests you can perform, to help show you the easiest method for your home or business.
pool chemicals test

Do you test your pool’s water chemistry often, or are you just dosing your pool periodically? Did you know there are multiple ways you can test a pool’s chemical balance?

Here, we’ll walk you through the different tests you can perform, to help show you the easiest method for your home or business.

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Why should you test your pool water chemistry?

The incorrect chemical level of a pool can have poor effects on a pool’s integrity as well as a person’s body. Having too low or too high acidity can cause damage to your pool’s shell, not to mention becoming unsafe to swim in and potentially causing rashes, which is why it’s essential to keep on top of the pool’s chemical balance, regardless of whether it is in use or closed for the season.

Unable to carry out these checks often? If you run a business and your facility requires help in setting up these processes, then get in touch with our team. We can provide you with weekly, monthly, or annual maintenance checks to suit your needs, along with a maintenance package as well.

We also stock a range of chemicals that will help get your chemical balance up to the correct levels in no time.

Using Pool Test Strips

Pool test strips may be the quickest method to easily measure the alkaline, pH and chlorine levels of a pool. Simply hold it under water for 2-3 seconds, wait for 15 seconds and then compare the colour to the package’s chart.

Top Tip: When removing the strip from the pool, be sure to keep the padded side facing up, as well as avoiding to shake excess water, so that you don’t interfere with the results.

Need to measure other different levels? Pool test strips that measure TDS (total dissolved solids) and other substances are also available to purchase.

 

Using Pool Testing Kits

Pool testing kits can also measure the alkalinity, pH and chlorine levels of the water, using a small sample mixed with a reagent.

To use a pool testing kit, the test vial should be filled according to the instructions provided (different models may require slightly different practices) and then add the required amount of reagent, before comparing the colour to the chart on the kit.

If you’ve been through this process before, but are using a different model, make sure to read the instructions thoroughly, as some models have different requirements from others.

Top Tip: Before filling up your test tube, make sure to clean it out well, so that no substance can potentially interfere with the results. It’s also recommended to collect your sample from at least 18” beneath the surface of your pool; avoid using surface water when filling up.

 

Using Digital Pool Testers

While digital testers are often more costly- and sometimes less accurate- than strips and kits, they can offer a variety of detail not seen with the latter models. These testers can be connected to smart devices and can show a varying level of detail, depending on what model you select and would like to know.

When using a digital tester, the app or device will supply you with all the instructions required to carry out a test.

Top Tip: Be sure to research the model you consider purchasing beforehand, as these can often vary greatly in quality.

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What do the different levels mean?

Pool Alkalinity

A pool with low alkalinity will have high acidity. This will become unsafe to swim in, if falling below 80 ppm, as well as putting your pool at risk of corrosion and damage.

The ideal level for a pool should sit between 80-150 ppm, although this is currently being debated and is suggested by some to sit at 80-120 ppm.

At Go Aqua, we offer a range of chemicals, including Alkalinity Adjusters, which can be used to correct these levels. Either contact the team to request a delivery of chemicals, or book a visit to have our team correct your pool water chemistry directly.

pH Levels

The incorrect pH level can have bad effects on both a person’s body and a pool’s structure. If the levels are too low, the pool can become damaged and stained, but too high can cause skin raises and cloudy water, which is why it is important to keep pH levels correct.

The ideal level should be 7.4-7.6 and should be monitored often.

To correct this, we can provide pH increasers and decreasers either from our range of stock or sourced from trusted suppliers nearby. Get in touch to place an order.

Chlorine Levels

Chlorine is used to keep your pool hygienic and sanitary. The incorrect level can lead to the corrosion of your pool or the growth of bacteria, if not high enough to kill germs, so should be checked often. CDC recommends pH 7.2–7.8 and a free chlorine concentration of at least 1 ppm in pools and at least 3 ppm in hot tubs/spas.

View our latest blog to learn more about the different pool chemicals and their uses.

At Go Aqua, we stock a range of chemicals, including Chlorine, Bromine, Oxidisers, Cyanuric Acid, pH increasers and decreasers and Alkalinity Adjusters. If we don’t stock the precise chemical you need, however, we have a trusted network of suppliers and distributors which we can source these from for you. 

Our experienced team are able to attend your facilities and carry out all tests and chemical application for you if you’re still a little apprehensive. Book a visit today.

 

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Get in touch today to book a call out to assess your pool's balance, or to order the chemicals you need.

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